Spreading Education to End Discrimination

A workshop offered by the
Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination (MCAD)

Thursday, July 31, 2014

2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

                                                                                                                                 

ILCNSCA Office

27 Congress St., Suite 107, Salem, Massachusetts

What You Will Learn:

 

The presentation will focus on discrimination in the workplace, in housing, and in public places. We will talk about:

  • What kinds of discrimination are prohibited by the law, including denial of
    accommodations, harassment, etc.
  • How to spot potential cases of unlawful discrimination.
  • How to file complaints about such cases.

 

MCAD is a state agency dedicated to eliminating and preventing discrimination, and educating citizens of the Commonwealth regarding their rights and duties under anti-discrimination statutes. The SEED (Spreading Education to End Discrimination) Program is a project of MCAD that works to further the goal of community education.

 

Please RSVP by July 24, 2014 online at www.ilcnsca.org/events.php or call 978-741-0077. For communication accommodations, please make your request by July 17, 2014. We ask that you please refrain from wearing scents or scented clothing to accommodate people with environmental sensitivities. Photographs and/or video may be taken for ILCNSCA publication. We will respect all requests not to be photographed, please inform us at time of RSVP or arrival.

 

City of Salem Achieves Perfect Score on the Human Rights Campaign’s 2014 Municipal Equality Index for LGBT-inclusive laws, policies and service

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

June 20, 2014

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:

Kristian Hoysradt

Director of Constituent Services & Special Projects

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Community Liaison

Office of Mayor Kimberley L. Driscoll, City of Salem

(978) 619-5601 | khoysradt@salem.com

City of Salem Achieves Perfect Score on the Human Rights Campaign’s

2014 Municipal Equality Index for LGBT-inclusive laws, policies and service

Salem, MA – On the eve of the 3rd Annual North Shore Pride Parade & Festival, Mayor Kim Driscoll announced today that the City of Salem has achieved a perfect score on the Human Rights Campaign’s Municipal Equality Index (MEI) for the LGBT-inclusivity of the City’s laws, policies and services.

Mayor Driscoll plans to make the formal announcement on stage at the North Shore Pride Festival tomorrow afternoon at Salem Common following the conclusion of the Pride Parade.

“Standing on the forefront of equality, Salem understands that the LGBT community strengthens our City’s fabric and I am thrilled that our efforts towards LGBT-inclusivity have been recognized by the Human Rights Campaign,” said Mayor Driscoll. “While famous for a tragic episode of discrimination and persecution in 1692, Salem now places tremendous value on ensuring equal protection under the law for all, no matter who you are, where you are from, or who you are perceived to be. We welcome all people who visit, live, study, and work in our community, and it is heartwarming to see that Salem is now becoming more renown for our advancement of human rights and social justice.”

In scoring 100% on the 2014 MEI, Salem follows Boston and Cambridge which were the only Massachusetts municipalities, among 25 nationally, to achieve a perfect score on the 2013 MEI last year. Unlike most municipalities included in the MEI which are chosen specifically by HRC for evaluation, the City of Salem voluntarily self-submitted its assessment and requested an evaluation from HRC.

“The MEI not only serves as an evaluation of municipal LGBT-inclusivity, it also provides local advocates with a guide to proactively further LGBT equality in their cities and towns,” said Cathryn Oakley, Legislative Counsel for State and Municipal Advocacy at the Human Rights Campaign. “Using the MEI criteria as a benchmark, Salem made impressive strides in achieving greater LGBT-inclusivity over the past year and the whole community should be proud of the standard Salem has set for other municipalities across Massachusetts and the United States.”

With the support of Mayor Driscoll last year, the Salem No Place for Hate Committee – Salem’s diversity committee – conducted a preliminary MEI assessment and identified areas where Salem could improve upon its LGBT-inclusivity. This prompted Mayor Driscoll and Police Chief Paul Tucker to designate the City’s first LGBT Community Liaisons in both the Mayor’s Office (Kristian Hoysradt) and Police Department (Lt. Conrad Prosniewski) last June, to provide direct points of contact for LGBT residents and visitors.

More recently, Salem made headlines with the successful No Place for Hate Committee-led passage of a fully inclusive non-discrimination ordinance through the Salem City Council, unanimously, which Mayor Driscoll supported and signed into law on March 3. In doing so, Salem became only the fifth community in Massachusetts and the first on the North Shore to extend protections against discrimination for the transgender community in public accommodations. Since then, the City of Somerville and the Town of Brookline have followed suit, with various other municipalities across the Commonwealth preparing to do the same.

“The mission of the Salem No Place for Hate Committee is to promote the acceptance of diversity and combat discrimination through educational and public awareness initiatives throughout the Salem community,” said Co-Chair Scott Weisberg. “The MEI presented us with a perfect opportunity for the Committee to identify what the City was lacking and how we could better ourselves with regard to LGBT-inclusivity. This recognition by HRC is the direct result of the strong leadership of Mayor Driscoll, Chief Tucker, the City Council and many, many organizations and individuals who contributed to these efforts over the past year. Our perfect score on the MEI is a wonderful declaration that the City of Salem, Massachusetts is in fact, no place for hate.”

The LGBT community has thrived under Mayor Driscoll’s leadership in Salem while the City has worked to support, promote, and enact LGBT equality over the course of her Administration:

– Nov 2006:Established Salem’s first diversity committee through the Salem No Place for Hate Committee

– July 2010: Welcomed the first North Shore Elder Services-sponsored ‘Over the Rainbow Coalition’ outing for LGBT seniors and allies at Salem Willows. The Coalition now meets for monthly dinners at the House of the Seven Gables in Salem

– Dec 2011: Became first Salem Mayor to recognize World AIDS Day every December by mayoral proclamation

– June 2012: Became first Salem Mayor to raise pride flags above Salem City Hall and Riley Plaza in recognition of LGBT Pride Month

– June 2012: Recognized local LGBT activist and drag queen Gary “Gigi” Gill as the official “Queen” of Salem with mayoral citation for his work on behalf of the LGBT community

– June 2012: Became first Salem Mayor to declare “North Shore Pride Day” by mayoral proclamation while the City Council passed the first resolution in support of North Shore Pride

– June 2012: Welcomed, marched in, and attended the first North Shore Pride & Festival in Salem

– Jan 2013: Submitted letter of support for the International Imperial Court’s nationwide campaign to lobby the U.S. Postal Service for a commemorative stamp honoring honor LGBT civil rights leader Harvey Milk

– March 2013: Raised the pride flag above Salem City Hall and changed her Facebook avatar to the HRC red and pink equality logo in solidarity with the LGBT community as the Proposition 8 and DOMA cases were heard before the U.S. Supreme Court

– April 2013: Signed on to the national “Mayors for the Freedom to Marry” coalition in support of marriage equality

– June 2013: Became the first Salem Mayor to host an official LGBT Pride Flag Raising Ceremony to kick-off LGBT pride month at Riley Plaza

– June 2013: With the Salem Police Chief, designated the first LGBT Community Liaisons in both the Mayor’s Office and Salem Police Department

– Sept 2013: Recognized the North Shore Alliance for LGBT Youth (nAGLY) with mayoral citation at their annual Gala for their support of Salem and the North Shore’s LGBT youth

– Oct 2013: Mayor’s Office LGBT Liaison Kristian Hoysradt recognized as one of “Salem’s Magic Makers” by Boston Spirit magazine

– Oct 2013: Recognized drag performer, recording artist and LGBT activist Sharon Needles and LGBT promotional events group Go Out Loud at their ‘Scream Out Loud’ Halloween event with mayoral citation for their work on behalf of the LGBT community

– Nov 2013: Became first Salem Mayor to attend the Human Rights Campaign New England Dinner & Gala

– Jan 2014: Recipient of the first annual Community Leadership Award by the Tiffany Club of New England at their First Event Transgender Conference for the Mayor’s LGBT advocacy

– March 2014: Salem City Council unanimously passed and Mayor Driscoll signed Salem’s non-discrimination ordinance, making Salem only the fifth community in Massachusetts to extend protections against discrimination to the transgender community in accommodations

– April 2014: Featured as prominent LGBT-ally in Boston Spirit magazine

– June 2014: Unveiled the U.S. Postal Service’s commemorative Harvey Milk Forever Stamp at the Salem Post Office where it will permanently hang in honor of the Milk’s legacy and the LGBT community

– June 2014: Submitted letter of support for the International Imperial Court’s nationwide campaign to lobby the U.S. Postal Service for a commemorative stamp honoring LGBT civil rights leader Bayard Rustin

– June 2014: City of Salem became the third community in Massachusetts and the 27th nationally to achieve a perfect score on the Human Rights Campaign’s Municipal Equality Index for LGBT-inclusive laws, policies and services

 

More information on the MEI is available at http://www.hrc.org/campaigns/municipal-equality-index, and the City of Salem’s complete MEI scorecard courtesy of HRC is attached.

###

 

Housing Committee Advances Commission to Prevent Bullying

Fri, 06/20/2014 – 13:18 — Jerry

 

Under a portrait of John Adams, 2nd President of the US and a framer of the Declaration of Independence, Halberstadt (center) thanks Chairman Kevin Honan (left) and Chairman Jamie Eldridge (right) for their support.

Under a portrait of John Adams, 2nd President of the US and a framer of the Declaration of Independence, Halberstadt (center) thanks Chairman Kevin Honan (left) and Chairman Jamie Eldridge (right) for their support.

On Wednesday, 18 June 2014, the Joint Committee on Housing of the Great Court of Massachusetts reported out a “resolve” creating a commission to study ways to prevent bullying and to protect elderly and disabled tenants living in subsidized, multi-family housing from bullying. Jerry Halberstadt, Coordinator of the Stop Bullying Coalition believes this resolve “to be the first effort in the nation seeking legislation to protect elderly and disabled tenants—urgently needed because bullying is truly harmful and deprives people of their human rights and their civil rights.”

The House Chairman of the Committee, Rep Kevin Honan and the Senate Chairman, Sen Jamie Eldridge congratulated Jerry Halberstadt, Coordinator of the Stop Bullying Coalition after the Committee had taken a favorable vote. Halberstadt thanked Honan and Eldridge on behalf of all who urgently need protection, and on behalf all of the citizens and groups as well as legislators who have joined in the advocacy for this legislation.

Under a portrait of John Adams, 2nd President of the US and a framer of the Declaration of Independence, Halberstadt (center) thanks Chairman Kevin Honan (left) and Chairman Jamie Eldridge (right) for their support and vision.

Under a portrait of John Adams, 2nd President of the US and a framer of the Declaration of Independence, Halberstadt (center) thanks Chairman Kevin Honan (left) and Chairman Jamie Eldridge (right) for their support.

The resolve must go through other committees, and if approved, will go to the floor for debate and votes. The Commission will report back on its findings and recommendations by the end of 2015.

The proposed legislation has received bipartisan support from legislators including Senators Joan Lovely and Bruce Tarr, and representatives including Brad Hill, Paul Heroux, Jay Livingstone, and Leah Cole, among many others. The problem of bullying in subsidized housing is a problem in many districts, and the effort to create legislation has begun to crystallize recognition and the desire to seek a remedy.

Advocacy groups for people living with disabilities and seniors like the Independent Living Center of the North Shore and Cape Ann (ILCNSCA) have endorsed and supported this effort. Mary Margaret Moore, Executive Director of ILCNSCA, said “Civil and human rights need to be afforded to all, and currently those of us who are looked at as having less worth, specifically those living with disabilities as well as seniors, are still at risk of being treated like objects, controlled by others who have more cultural status, and thus receive societally condoned discrimination, abuse, and violence. This commission will hopefully be able to develop statewide, regional, and local strategies to stop the bullying, especially against those trying to live independently and productively in their own homes, regardless of subsidies.”

“This Commission will be able to shine a bright light into the dark places where bullying hides, and once again Massachusetts has taken the lead in seeking to protect the rights of all citizens,” said Halberstadt. He added, “The Commission method is a great problem-solving process, bringing together for consideration interests, ideas, and solutions from many different angles and from all stakeholders. The Commission is a good method for solving complex problems through a process of discussion and negotiation—the essence of democracy.”

“Michael Kane, Executive Director of the Mass Alliance of HUD Tenants, has been a strong advocate for the rights of HUD tenants for decades, and his support and advice as a partner of the Stop Bullying Coalition have been central to our success to date,” said Jerry Halberstadt.

“The Commission signals important recognition by legislators and state agencies of the bullying epidemic that plagues so many tenants in senior and handicapped buildings,” commented Michael Kane, Executive Director of the Mass Alliance of HUD Tenants. “We look forward to working with the Commission to develop comprehensive, resident driven solutions to this problem.”

The Commission will have six consumer advocacy representatives, appointed by the Governor from a panel of experienced and dedicated organizations including “the Massachusetts Association of Independent Living Centers, Jewish Family and Children’s Services, Massachusetts Alliance of HUD Tenants, Massachusetts Union of Public Housing Tenants, Stop Bullying Coalition, legal services organizations such as Mass Law Reform Institute and Disability Law Center, and individuals with direct experience and knowledge of the issue that can contribute to the commission.”

The Commission will bring together legislators, state agencies, and consumer advocates to understand the causes of bullying, to seek solutions, and to provide a report on their findings to the legislature with recommendations for action. They will gather information and testimony from experts, stakeholders, and the public, holding hearings in several parts of the Commonwealth. The work of the Commission is expected to raise public awareness of the problem of bullying affecting elders and disabled.

CONTACT

Jerry Halberstadt, Coordinator, Stop Bullying Coalition

StopBullyingCoalition@gmail.com

Twitter: @PhotoLumination

Jerry’s blog “Stop Bullying”

Media: A text of the resolve and background information on advocacy groups is available at http://photoluminations.com/drupal/?q=node/164 (below).

TEXT OF RESOLVE

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts

In the Year Two Thousand Fourteen

An Act A Resolve creating a commission to study ways to prevent bullying of tenants in public and subsidized multi-family housing.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Court assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows:

There is hereby established a commission to consist of 19 members, 1 of whom shall be the secretary of the executive office of health and human services, or a designee, who shall serve as chair of the commission; 1 of whom shall be the attorney general, or a designee; 1 of whom shall be the secretary of the executive office of elder affairs, or a designee; 1 of whom shall be the undersecretary of the department of housing and community development, or a designee; 1 of whom shall be the commissioner of the department of mental health, or a designee; 2 of whom shall be the chairs of the joint committee on housing, or their designees; 2 of whom shall be the chairs of the joint committee on elder affairs, or their designees; 2 of whom shall be the chairs of the joint committee on mental health and substance abuse, or their designees; 1 of whom shall be appointed by the minority leader of the house of representatives; 1 of whom shall be appointed by the minority leader of the senate; and 6 of whom shall be appointed by the governor, and shall be representatives of consumer protection advocacy organizations, such as the Massachusetts Association of Independent Living Centers, Jewish Family and Children’s Services, Massachusetts Alliance of HUD Tenants, Massachusetts Union of Public Housing Tenants, Stop Bullying Coalition, legal services organizations such as Mass Law Reform Institute and Disability Law Center, and individuals with direct experience and knowledge of the issue that can contribute to the commission.

The commission shall study the prevalence and impact of the bullying of tenants, with a focus on elderly and disabled tenants, in public and subsidized multi-family housing. This shall include, but not be limited to identifying the conditions that give rise to and cause bullying; researching and investigating successful methods for preventing bullying in other contexts, including but not limited to schools, nursing homes, assisted living, the workplace, and housing. This research shall be used to identify and develop best practices; raise public awareness; and propose public policy recommendations and legislation necessary to protect tenants from harm and preserve their rights.

The commission shall identify and invite to participate and contribute individuals with experience and knowledge of bullying in public or subsidized housing including tenants who have been victimized by bullying, managers who coordinate resident services, industry professionals and stakeholders, and individuals who have direct experience with bullying prevention. The commission shall hold public meetings in various locations throughout the Commonwealth in recognition of the difficulty some individuals may have in travelling long distances to attend commission meetings.

The commission shall submit its findings and recommendations with the clerks of the house of representatives and senate, the joint committee on housing, the joint committee on elder affairs and the joint committee on mental health and substance abuse not later than December 31, 2015.

BACKGROUND

On commissions: http://photoluminations.com/drupal/?q=node/163

Development of the movement: http://photoluminations.com/drupal/?q=taxonomy/term/61

The Stop Bullying Coalition grew out of efforts to create legal protections against bullying in subsidized housing. Based on a right of petition established in the Constitution of the Commonwealth, Halberstadt, with help from Michael Kane and input from many others, including targets of bullying, submitted a petition and bill to the legislature. This became a bill, S604, submitted “by request” by state Senator Joan Lovely at the beginning of the current legislative session in January 2013 (188th, 2013-2014). Although the bill had a very positive reception when terstimony was presented to the Joint Committee on Housing, it needed additional work before it could be voted out of committee. Rep Brad Hill suggested creating a commission in order to keep momentum and create the basis for a stronger bill. The new resolve was written in cooperation with Kurt Stiegel, Research director for Rep. Kevin Hogan, Chairman of the Housing Committee and Halberstadt, with input from other advocates and the guidance of John Horgan, Legislative Aide to Senator Lovely.

The Independent Living Center of the North Shore and Cape Ann Inc. (ILCNSCA) is a service and advocacy center run by and for people with disabilities. “Services and Advocacy for an Independent Life” ILCNSCA supports the struggle of people who have all types of disabilities to live independently and participate fully in community life.

Mary Margaret Moore, Executive Director, 27 Congress St, Suite 107, Salem, MA 01970, 978-741-0077         mmmoore@ilcnsca.org | www.ilcnsca.org | www.facebook.com/ilcnsca

The Mass Alliance of HUD Tenants, a branch of the National Alliance of HUD Tenants, is a multi-cultural, tenant-controlled alliance of tenant organizations in privately-owned, multifamily HUD-assisted housing. Hundreds of tenant associations representing thousands of tenants in every region of the country are already involved, working together to Preserve affordable housing * Protect tenants’ rights * Promote tenant ownership and control

Michael Kane is the Executive Director of the Mass. as well as the National Alliance. 42 Seaverns Avenue, Boston, MA 02130, tel: (617) 267-9564, naht@saveourhomes.org

 

Olmstead 15th Anniversary [Part Two] – How Much Progress Has Your State Made? Information Bulletin # 391 (6/2014).

In the previous Information Bulletin, Olmstead 15th Anniversary [Part One]

– How Much Progress Has Your State Made? we provided a State-by-State breakdown of Medicaid Long Term Services and Supports for both institutional expenditures and community-based Medicaid expenditures, comparing Fiscal Years 2000 and 2012.

In this Information Bulletin, we will look at the biggest institution for people with disabilities =E2=80=93 nursing homes.  The 2000 census reports that there were 1,720,500 persons of all ages with disabilities residing in nursing homes. [Remember, people must be disabled in order to receive Medicaid reimbursement for nursing home care; they do not qualify based on age alone.]  How much progress have we made?  By March 31, 2013, the number had been reduced to 1,414,957 an 18% reduction in the population of institutionalized disabled people.   [See Chart One below for a State-by-State breakdown.]

June 22, 2014 is the Fifteenth Anniversary of the Supreme Court Olmstead decision.  In accordance with that decision and with the ADAs most integrated setting requirement, people with disabilities should be free from being unnecessarily isolated or at risk of unnecessary isolation in nursing homes.

 While there has been an 18% reduction in the nursing home population of people with disabilities nationwide, rates vary among the States.  Hawaii had a 28% increase and Nevada had a 4% increase in nursing home population from 2000 to 2013; however, these were the only two states that increased their institutional populations.  A few States had small reductions of less than by 5% (Georgia had only a 1% reduction and Maryland had only a 5% reduction, which was followed closely by Texas and New Jerseys reductions at 7% and 9% respectively.

 On the positive side, Oregon was the most effective State at reducing its nursing home population with a reduction of 47%, second was Alaska at 36% and the following States all reduced these populations by at least 30% (Idaho, Maine, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Vermont, D.C., and Wisconsin).  Kudos to those States.

 While we do not have current comparison data for average Nursing Home occupancy rates, we do have it for 2011, when the national average occupancy rate was 83%.  One might think that a State that had low nursing home occupancy rates would also be reducing its Medicaid expenditures on nursing homes.  After all, it seems that reduced numbers of persons with disabilities in the nursing homes and many unused/unoccupied nursing home beds should result in less total Medicaid funds going to keep people with disabilities unnecessarily isolated or at risk of such isolation. [See Chart Two below.]

 Are you surprised to learn that between 2000 and 2012 there was a 31% increase in the total amount of Medicaid funding for nursing home residents= ?

There was a $12.4 billion increase in Medicaid funding for nursing homes during those years despite both an 18% reduction in number of residents and only an 83% occupancy rate. [See Charts Three and Four below.]

 Sometimes I know I am in the wrong business.

 What is amazing given these reductions and relatively low occupancy rates between 2000 and 2012 is that the national average of Medicaid nursing home expenditures actually increased by 31%!  There was a total of $12.4 billion more Medicaid expenditures over that period. Here are the States that increased their Medicaid nursing home expenditures by more than 80%:

Arizona, Arkansas, California, Idaho, Indiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Nevada, Utah, Virginia.  Although Delaware, Michigan and D.C. had less than a 10% increase, there were a few States that actually reduced the percentage of their nursing home expenditures, including Hawaii, Minnesota, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee.

 It is hard to believe that the community of disability advocates cannot make the cost savings argument to your State legislatures and your Governors. We can and must make arguments newspapers, TV, and social media outlets that will result in real outrage.

 We know that more than 90% of aged and younger people with disabilities do not want to be institutionalized and would prefer to reside in their own homes and communities.  We also know that it is cost effective to provide these services in the community and that they have actually been provided for people exactly like those residing in nursing homes.

 This is a shame.  So what is happening? The nursing home industry is ripping off your State budgets.  (In the next Information Bulletin, we’ll discuss what is going on in those nursing homes.)

Here are four State-by-State Charts:  the first is the decrease in nursing home populations from 2000 =E2=80=93 2013, the second is the nursing home o= ccupancy rates in 2011, the third is the % increase in nursing home Medicaid expenditures between 2000 and 2012, and the fourth is the actual Medicaid dollar increase in nursing home expenditures between 2000 and 2012.

 *Chart One – % decrease in nursing home populations from 2000 – 2013.*

 Alabama

 -1-13%

Alaska

-36%

Arizona

-8%

Arkansas

-16%

California

-12%

Colorado

-10%

Connecticut

-21%

Delaware

-10%

Florida

-14%

Georgia

-1%

Hawaii

28%

Idaho

-30%

Illinois

-18%

Indiana

-18%

Iowa

-24%

Kansas

-26%

Kentucky

-20%

Louisiana

-18%

Maine

-31%

Maryland

-5%

Massachusetts

-23%

Michigan

-18%

Minnesota

-32%

Mississippi

-12%

Missouri

-21%

Montana

-26%

Nebraska

-24%

Nevada

4%

New Hampshire

-25%

New Jersey

-9%

New Mexico

-12%

New York

-12%

North Carolina

-25%

North Dakota

-21%

Ohio

-15%

Oklahoma

-32%

Oregon

-47%

Pennsylvania

-28%

Rhode Island

-11%

South Carolina

-18%

South Dakota

-18%

Tennessee

-17%

Texas

-7%

Utah

-16%

Vermont

-31%

Virginia

-24%

Washington

-24%

DC

-30%

West Virginia

-17%

Wisconsin

-31%

Wyoming

-17%

  U.S.

-1-18%

*Chart Two    nursing home occupancy rates in 2011*

Alabama

85.40%

Alaska

91.30%

Arizona

70.40%

Arkansas

72.80%

California

84.90%

Colorado

80.50%

Connecticut

88.70%

Delaware

86.10%

Florida

87.60%

Georgia

85.30%

Hawaii

91.40%

Idaho

69.80%

Illinois

78.50%

Indiana

78.50%

Iowa

79.70%

Kansas

82.70%

Kentucky

89.60%

Louisiana

72.50%

Maine

91.00%

Maryland

87.60%

Massachusetts

88.30%

Michigan

85.00%

Minnesota

90.60%

Mississippi

88.20%

Missouri

71.80%

Montana

69.50%

Nebraska

78.30%

Nevada

81.60%

New Hampshire

89.70%

New Jersey

87.90%

New Mexico

82.70%

New York

91.80%

North Carolina

86.20%

North Dakota

90.30%

Ohio

85.30%

Oklahoma

67.30%

Oregon

61.40%

Pennsylvania

90.40%

Rhode Island

92.20%

South Carolina

89.50%

South Dakota

100.00%

Tennessee

84.90%

Texas

69.90%

Utah

66.30%

Vermont

87.60%

Virginia

88.20%

Washington

80.40%

DC

93.40%

West Virginia

88.10%

Wisconsin

83.10%

Wyoming

81.60%

U.S.

83.0%

*Chart Three – % increase in nursing home Medicaid expenditures between

2000 and 2012*

Alabama

39%

Alaska

115%

Arizona

3068%

Arkansas

119%

California

90%

Colorado

71%

Connecticut

28%

Delaware

8%

Florida

77%

Georgia

61%

Hawaii

-99%

Idaho

92%

Illinois

12%

Indiana

92%

Iowa

15%

Kansas

26%

Kentucky

51%

Louisiana

67%

Maine

13%

Maryland

82%

Massachusetts

31%

Michigan

7%

Minnesota

-4%

Mississippi

97%

Missouri

29%

Montana

26%

Nebraska

-6%

Nevada

123%

New Hampshire

51%

New Jersey

11%

New Mexico

-98%

New York

10%

North Carolina

47%

North Dakota

13%

Ohio

13%

Oklahoma

60%

Oregon

38%

Pennsylvania

-6%

Rhode Island

31%

South Carolina

54%

South Dakota

31%

Tennessee

-7%

Texas

67%

Utah

85%

Vermont

50%

Virginia

68%

Washington

1%

DC

54%

West Virginia

94%

Wisconsin

13%

Wyoming

108%

  U.S.

31%

* Chart Four – actual Medicaid dollar increase in nursing home expenditures between 2000 and 2012*

Alabama

$255,754,231

Alaska

$69,148,946

Arizona

$475,688,312

Arkansas

$360,783,181

California

$1,998,500,869

Colorado

$257,127,331

Connecticut

$272,916,597

Delaware

$7,535,638

Florida

$1,220,177,047

Georgia

$462,313,596

Hawaii

(-$147,584,084)

Idaho

$102,276,230

Illinois

$187,080,589

Indiana

$705,632,599

Iowa

$73,325,212

Kansas

$92,238,026

Kentucky

$284,788,789

Louisiana

$346,159,432

Maine

$25,352,670

Maryland

$509,910,527

Massachusetts

$429,138,089

Michigan

$116,400,288

Minnesota

(-$32,379,189)

Mississippi

$373,034,866

Missouri

$213,203,966

Montana

$33,015,318

Nebraska

(-$21,419,330)

Nevada

$105,515,937

New Hampshire

$110,248,344

New Jersey

$177,204,426

New Mexico

(-$161,591,525)

New York

$620,173,358

North Carolina

$390,328,061

North Dakota

$22,665,290

Ohio

$274,931,768

Oklahoma

$185,939,465

Oregon

$90,763,291

Pennsylvania

(-$231,182,111)

Rhode Island

$75,641,677

South Carolina

$195,064,443

South Dakota

$31,717,171

Tennessee

(-$72,734,458)

Texas

$959,781,368

Utah

$80,111,282

Vermont

$39,090,314

Virginia

$332,358,019

Washington

$4,179,217

DC

$76,178,032

West Virginia

$259,072,260

Wisconsin

$113,425,426

Wyoming

$52,403,886

  U.S.

$12,401,404,686

Special thanks to Truven Health Analytics and Kaiser Commission for background data.

Steve Gold, The Disability Odyssey continues

Back issues of other Information Bulletins posted after 10/2013 can be found only at http://stevegoldada.blogspot.com/

Information Bulletins before 10/2013 are available online at http://www.stevegoldada.com with a searchable Archive at this site divided into different subjects.

To contact Steve Gold directly, write to stevegoldada1@gmail.com <stevegoldada@cs.com> or call 215-627-7100. Ext 227.

Steve Gold, The Disability Odyssey continues

Back issues of other Information Bulletins are available online at http://www.stevegoldada.com

Kids and Teens, Stop By For a Free Meal in Salem!

No need to be enrolled in a program to get a meal!

 

USDA’s Summer Food Service Program 2014

 

 Location Dates Meal Times Days

 

 

 Nathaniel Bowditch Elementary School

79 Willson St.

7/14-8/22 L: 11 AM-12:30 PM M-F
Bentley Elementary School

25 Memorial Dr.

7/7-7/31 B: 7:30 AM-8:30 AM

L: 11 AM-12:15 PM

M,Tu,W,Th
Collins Middle School

29 Highland Ave.

7/28-8/8 L: 11 AM-12:30 PM M-F
Forest River Park

10 Forest St./End of West St.

7/7-8/22 L: 11 AM-12 PM M-F
Palmer Cove

Leavitt St. & Congress St.

7/7-8/22 L: 12 PM-1 PM M-F
Pequot Highlands

12 First St.

7/7-8/22 L: 12 PM-1 PM M-F
Rainbow Terrace

Loring Ave.

7/7-8/22 L: 11 AM-12 PM M-F
Camp Fire Boys & Girls

2 Cain Road

6/30-8/29 B: 7:30 AM-8:30 AM

L: 11:30 AM-12:30 PM

M-F

 

 

*For rain locations and times, visit www.meals4kids.org/find-summer-meal-site.

 

To find a SFSP site near you:

Call 1-800-645-8333 | Visit www.Meals4Kids.org | Text 617-863-6325(MEAL)

New Exciting Opportunities to Advance Your Career

Have you or someone you know ever thought of owning your own business?

Here is your opportunity to learn how to BE YOUR OWN BOSS!

 

 

Free Business Workshops and Individual Business Counseling

OFFERED IN SPANISH

 

Thinking about Starting a Business: Plans & Steps

Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014, 6:00 to 8:00 p.m.

104 Lafayette Street, Salem MA – North Shore CDC Offices

Financing your Business: Do You Qualify?

Thursday, November 20, 2014, 6:00 to 8:00 p.m.

104 Lafayette Street, Salem MA – North Shore CDC Offices

For more information go to

www.enterprisectr.org/lswanson@enterprisectr.org or 978-542-7031

 

Is English preventing you from your obtaining your dream job or entering a career?

 

Then the Free 20 week Intensive Contextualized ESL Workshops and Career Pathway Instruction is for you!

Dates, time, and location To be determined

For more information Contact:

Elsabel Rincon Elsabel@northshorecdc.org /(978) 219 5016